Autopsy May Shed Light On Schiavo's Medical Condition

 

Local 6 News | April 1, 2005

An autopsy being performed on the body of Terri Schiavo could help determine what Schiavo's state of consciousness was and whether she was abused by her husband, as the woman's parents allege, according to a Local 6 News report.

Schiavo, 41, died Thursday, nearly two weeks after her feeding tube was removed by a judge's order. Michael Schiavo said his wife told him long ago that she would not want to be kept alive artificially.

Her parents, Bob and Mary Schindler, disputed that, and held out hope for a miracle recovery for a daughter they said still struggled to talk.

he disagreement over Terri Schiavo's medical condition for the last 15 years will be settled by yet another outsider -- Dr. John Thogmartin, chief medical examiner for Pinellas .

It could take several weeks to get the report, which the law requires be made public. It will include a thorough examination by a board-certified neuropathologist, as well as routine forensic procedures and X-rays.

That could shed light on two questions that have been publicly raised:

Was Terri Schiavo's diagnosis of "persistent vegetative state" correct? Her husband hopes it will offer definitive proof of that diagnosis.

Although doctors cited Schiavo's brain scans as evidence of brain damage, they based their diagnoses of persistent vegetative state mostly on her behavior.

Experts say a brain autopsy could lend more support by showing patterns of brain damage consistent with a persistent vegetative state.

"If there's very extensive brain injury, it would be hard to accept another diagnosis as being conceivable," said Dr. Roger Albin, a neurology professor and director of the brain bank at the University of Michigan Medical School.

The other question that an autopsy could answer would be: Was she physically abused, as her family suggested and her husband has repeatedly denied?

An autopsy can detect whether bones have broken and healed, even many years ago. It can't determine when the injury occurred. But comparisons with X-rays from previous dates could help get a fix on that.


 

Were doctors right?

Associated Press | April 1, 2005

AN AUTOPSY on Terri Schiavos body will include a thorough examination by a board-certified neuropathologist, as well as routine forensic procedures and X-rays. It could take several weeks to get the report, which the law requires be made public. An autopsy could shed light on two questions that have been raised:

--Was Terri Schiavo's diagnosis of "persistent vegetative state" correct?

Doctors have cited Schiavo's brain scans as evidence of brain damage,but they based their diagnoses of persistent vegetative state mostly on her behaviour.

--Was she physically abused, as her family suggested and her husband has repeatedly denied?

An autopsy can detect bones that have broken and healed, even many years ago.


 

Cremation and No Autopsy Planned for Terri Schiavo
Its Obvious Michael is Hiding Something

NewsMax | March 28, 2005

Michael Schiavo has taken steps that will prevent investigators from examining Terri Schiavo's body for evidence of abuse after she dies a suspicion her family has repeatedly raised as her death grows more imminent.

Schiavo's attorney George Felos told the Washington Post on Friday that Terri will be cremated and buried in a plot owned by Michael's family in Pennsylvania.

Terri's parents had filed a request with the court to block the cremation plans, saying it would violate the religious beliefs of their daughter, who was a practicing a Catholic.

But as with every other motion filed in the case on behalf of Bob and Mary Schindler, the Florida courts have rejected the request.

A 1991 bone scan performed on Terri Schiavo showed unexplained injuries to her vertebrae and legs.

Terri's brother, Bobby Schindler, told Fox News Channel's "Hannity and Colmes" on Thursday that a doctor has testified that she might have been strangled before she was found unconscious in her home in February 1990.


Terri Schiavo Archive